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How to use media for development - and why it works.

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Author: BBC Media Action Senior Production Managery Clemency Fraser, originally published July 31 2017 - Have you ever wanted to see how we create media for development? Well, good news folks now you can.

BBC Media Action has been creating innovative and effective media for development across the globe since the 1990s – it’s been quite a journey. Of course, we’ve sometimes learnt lessons the hard way but we’ve also had phenomenal successes. Here are a few.

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Motivating ordinary Bangladeshis to respond to extreme weather

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Author: BBC Media Action Bangladesh's Executive Editor Shihan Zuberi, originally published on the Asian Cities Climate Change Resilience Network (ACCCRN) blog - Droughts. Cyclones. Floods.

There are few places where such extraordinary events are as commonplace as they are in Bangladesh,  one of the most disaster-prone countries in the world. Extreme weather poses a real threat to millions of Bangladeshis – with low-lying geography, high population density and under-developed infrastructure making things worse, especially for the poorest.

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Zambia’s Modern Day Politicians and Lost Art of Rhetoric

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Author: Journalist, Media Consultant and Economist Daniel Tonga, July 25 2017 - When one listens to politicians speak and takes a critical analysis of their political discourse, there is no doubt that present day politicians seriously lack the art of political rhetoric in Zambia. In times of a crisis or disaster, politicians are too quick to accuse their political rivals of sabotage using most the despicable language and speeches that end up dividing people instead of uniting them. They often use derogatory terms and threats as a way to convince people that they are in charge and under control. Their manner of speech is no different in even in times of elections. They insult, offend and disparage each other to gain political mileage. Sadly, even within their internal party systems at conventions where they gather to elect new officials, they malign each other without any sense of using civilised speech to persuade people to vote for them.

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The Clean Energy Revolution

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Author: Tayyab Shafique Mughal, July 26 2017 - Pakistan is a developing country and ranking 6th in terms of population size. Despite having incredible economic development and environmental opportunities, Pakistan has been facing frequent challenging issues including substructure, inadequate refined resources, infertile or obsolete factories, water and sanitation, poverty, climate change and energy crisis.  Pakistan’s dominant challenges are energy demand and climate change. Whereas it has been struggling to fulfil energy demand but it is also facing climate change catastrophe. Worldwide, Pakistan has little contribution to greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and rank 135th among all the countries, in contrast, as reported by Germanwatch Climate Risk Index, 2017, it ranks 7th on vulnerability to climate change adverse impacts having 30.50 Climate Risk Index (CRI).

The Impact of New Media Technologies on Zambia’s 2016 Presidential elections.

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Author: Daniel Tonga, July 18 2017 - Abstract: The emergence of new media technologies has changed the way in which political communication takes place in Zambia. On 11thAugust 2016, Zambia held presidential, parliamentary and local government elections in which nine political parties massively used new media technologies to campaign before and during elections. The utilisation of new media technologies by political parties introduced a new way in political communication and had a great impact on how politics are conducted in Zambia. This study aims to assess the effectiveness of new media technologies in political campaigns during the time of elections. For the first time ever in the political history of Zambia, political parties used new media technologies massively in political campaigns to engage the electorate and this has brought a new facet in political communication which has now became beneficial to Zambian politics and culture.

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Why the role of the media is so important to free and fair elections in Africa

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Author: George Ogola, originally posted May 16 2017 - The news media is usually one of first casualties of bungled or contested elections. From the recent US elections, the UK’s Brexit vote to Zambia’s controversial 2016 presidential elections, the mainstream news media bore the brunt of much of the criticism that followed.

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No answers without questions: a decade of debate in Nepal

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Author: BBC Media Action's Pratibha Tuladhar, originally published July 3 2017 - As Sajha Sawal broadcasts its 500th episode, the team members reflect on what the programme means to the Nepali audience – and them.

“Who will answer my questions? When will we experience respite? We’ve been quiet for a long time. Speak up. Change begins with you.”

These are words from the song composed by a group of young Sajha Sawal viewers. It’s a song about aspiring for a better future. Week after week our national television and radio debate programme has been a platform for people from all communities in Nepal to voice their hopes and urge the country’s leaders to make them a reality.

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Polio: Highest Hopes and Deepest Fears for the GPEI Based on Where It Is Now

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Author: Peter K.A. da Costa, Ph.D., July 7 2017 - is a member of the Horn of Africa Polio Technical Advisory Group (TAG) and has been a technical advisor on polio communication in Central Africa as well as Nigeria. He has worked as a development expert in and on Africa as well as on global issues and initiatives for more than two decades and, among many other things, serves as Senior Adviser to the Africa Progress Panel, chaired by former UN Secretary-General Kofi Annan. He holds a Ph.D. in Development Studies and is based in Nairobi, Kenya.

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Let's talk about sex: using radio to educate teenagers in Bangladesh

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Author: Gourob Kundu, originally posted June 30 2017 - Our world is home to 1.8 billion young people. The majority of these 10 to 24-year-olds live in Asia, with 48 million alone growing up in Bangladesh.  

Our world is home to 1.8 billion young people. The majority of these 10 to 24-year-olds live in Asia, with 48 million alone growing up in Bangladesh.  

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The rise of edutainment: taking stock of the evidence

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Author: Sonia Whitehead, BBC Media Action Head of Research Programmes, originally posted June 21 2017 - Around the world, growing numbers of people have more and more access to endless distractions. Global smartphone ownership is on the rise. Between 2014 and 2015 alone, the number of Nigerians going online multiple times a day increased by 20%.

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